This weekend

Journalist and educator Lisa Loving and I definitely share a passion for community reporting and the need to help shape how media and reporting is evolving.

She asked me to speak about my work at a signing for her new book: “Street Journalist: Understand and Report the News in Your Community” this week.

I am thankful for her input on the work we’re doing, the opportunity to speak, and the entire evening’s discussion.

Ask for Loving’s book at your local bookstore, or purchase it online at Powell’s.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28TH

Learn more about the Johnson Creek Floodplain (event):

“Join us for a free, family-friendly event to learn more about the Johnson Creek floodplain and how to protect your family from flooding. Enjoy games, crafts, and raffle prizes. Grab a donut, coffee, or hot chocolate on us!

Representatives from Reed College, the Wharton School of Risk Management, Hagan Hamilton Insurance, and City of Portland Environmental Services will be available… “

Zenger Farm, 11741 SE Foster Rd * 9 am – 11 am

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Lents Community Harvest Festival:

At this, the 16th annual festival, there’s be crafts, games, door prizes, and a quilt raffle!

Pilgrim Lutheran Church, 4244 SE 91st Ave * 1 pm – 4 pm

This weekend

Portland neighbors put a lot of work into their neighborhood associations, but after a considerable time with a front-row seat at several, the institution always seems to attract conflict. Is this just the nature of humanity, or trying around geography? You’d think common ground was a good place to start.

While the conversation has been around how to bring new groups to the table, I’ve been wondering how we could fix the current system. Reform to the grievance system and more support and training to help board members encourage engagement are my first ideas…

If you have ideas, I’d like to hear them, and will be starting a story soon to bring more ideas forward. Thanks for reading and being involved as we work together to improve civic engagement.

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This is the second of a five-episode series that played on Open Signal earlier this year. The series is a compilation of Village Portland videos that feature Portlanders organizing events and serving their community.

In this episode, we feature the annual Halloween party at Burnside Skatepark; the Portland Krampus Walk; a performance at a MLK celebration; a visit to the Grotto for their Christmas choir concerts; an interview with the designer of the Cascadian flag; and a look at the City of Portland’s Sunday Parkways.

HALLOWEEN FUN

Haunted Ghost Town (event):

This weekend and next weekend as well…

‘“Where History Won’t Die’, Portland’s newest haunted attraction!” 

Rossi Farms, 3839 NE 122nd Ave * adult $12, youth $8 * 7 pm – 9:30 pm

Village Portland update!

Hello everyone! It’s Andrew here, I just wanted to say hello and update you on what Village Portland has been up to.

We’ve added new neighborhoods, partnerships, and reporters— and we are stoked about some new moves in the works.

Cory Elia (Reflection: conducting the survey for the Portland Street Response) and Lesley McLam have been doing some awesome work around homelessness and homeless organizing, and are focusing in on more focused reporting on the areas of PSU and St Johns, respectively.

McLam has been reporting on Jason Barns Landing, a managed camp in North Portland that’s taking what I see as a civil disobedience approach to their camp. And their answering the question: what happens when homeless folk tire of being moved— tired of having their community scattered— keep coming back to the same place?

Both Elia and McLam are volunteers at community radio station KBOO, and use their equipment to publish a podcast called TRIP-P. Like KBOO, Open Signal, is a resource for community media creators that we’ve been collaborating with.

Another media non-profit that trains homeless youth in video storytelling we’re collaborating with, Outside the Frame, also uses Open Signal equipment.

Here’s the third episode of Village Portland Presents, a five-episode series we produced for Open Signal earlier this year. It’s a compilation of video stories, themed around community organizing and culture.

It’s been great to meet other organizations and folks passionate about independent media, and offering more folks a chance to tell their stories.

Here’s our take on the 82nd Avenue Parade of Roses for 2019

It rained really hard earlier that morning, but when it was time for the parade to roll, the 82nd Avenue of Roses Parade was blessed with dry and sometimes sunny weather… typical spring in the Willamette Valley.

82nd Avenue is the highway that binds together multiple neighborhoods in East Portland— including Powellhurst-Gilbert. And the groups that march proudly are just a tiny fraction of those that make East Portland a great place to live.

I hope you enjoy all the people and smiles that made the parade so enjoyable (and tolerate our zany commentary). We hope it encourages you to find your own way to get involved.